If it makes you feel like you want to vomit.

Just a quick post to commemorate the day, what with it being my last at [international hair and beauty corporation]. I’m officially a stay-at-home freelancer.

Image courtesy of Raving Dave

I heard a friend say this once, “If it makes you feel like you’re going to vomit, you’re on the right track!” She wasn’t talking about a night at the bar; rather, she was talking about how to know if a decision or life change was right.  I’ve been thinking about this little saying for the past week or so, because as I’ve gotten closer to my end working date, the uncertainty of what I’m moving toward has become more real in my brain, more prevalent in my thoughts.  It has made me feel like vomiting, a little!  Because I have had a tendency, in the past, to go charging toward something thinking it will be the perfect thing, the solution I’ve been waiting for!, only to find that it, too, has its pitfalls.

This is a much different change, though, and I’m excited.  I’m working with a great company, and the transition feels really natural, not at all jarring.  The timing feels right, and I’m so excited to see what’s next!

 

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confessions of know-it-all’ingness.

Thought of the day: it’s not that the customer/client is always right, but rather that I don’t always need to be right. Right?

I have a tendency toward know-it-all’ingness.  It’s not pretty.  I think there’s a gene in the family, probably on both sides, where we must be right, and we must know that you know that we are right.  I’ve also been known, not willing to recognize the fault in myself, to scrutinize others for the same flaw.  But, as with anything, knowing is half the battle.

I had a moment working with a client today where I held my tongue, made the requested edits, and moved on to the next task.  Now, you can understand this was difficult, as the issue at hand was whether autumnal allergies could be caused by pollen, because isn’t pollen more a springtime thing?  I looked it up, of course, and thought about tossing in an off-handed remark about knowing that, in fact, allergies at this time of year could indeed be pollen-related, because I, personally, suffer this particular malady, at this time, every year.

You can just hear the peevishness in my tone, can’t you.  It’s there, and repeating it here makes it that much more obvious.  And annoying.  And petty-sounding.  I mean, really.  Why is it so important to expend energy thinking about setting him straight?  And did I need to verify the facts on WebMD.com (and yes, this is the link to the Fall Allergies info page)?  Or consider sending a link just so they would know I was right, or that this type of allergy was valid?  A-nnoy-ing.  Do you ever have moments when you wonder how the people around you even like you sometimes?  I’m such a pain in the ass sometimes!

today, part I: wild.

I started today with a run.  You know what I’ve found?  Before I go to bed, if I set out the clothes I’m going to wear in the morning, it becomes a no-brainer to go for a run.  I mean, for the most part.  If you’re going to sleep, you’re going to sleep, and some days there’s not a damn thing that can be done to change it.  But, most of the time, this simple maneuver gets me up out of bed, and onto the trails before I even know what’s happening.  It’s like you’ve already scheduled it into your subconscious calendar, so it’s automatic.

My point being, that I set out my clothes last night, and went for a run first thing this morning.  A longer route around the lake, to turn the 2.7 of the shoreline trail into a 4-miler.  Easy peasy.  Except that I was wearing a new pair of socks, which are smart wool, which everyone swears by, but I can’t get behind.  They’re still wool, and they still itch a bit sometimes, and I’m already damn picky about what I wear on my feet.  So, the run was sort of whiny and bitchy, and I stopped 3 blocks from the house and removed shoes and said socks, and happily walked the remaining distance barefooteded.

I worked from home today, which is always lovely.  After the run, I had some coffee, and started to work.  I took a short break mid morning to read a bit, because I am currently experiencing the wanderlust, in anticipation of a road trip to KC, then Denver and maybe the Black Hills, and this book has got me roped in:

http://www.amazon.com/Wild-Found-Pacific-Crest-Oprahs/dp/0307592731/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1340815040&sr=8-1&keywords=wild%3A+from+lost+to+found#reader_0307592731

I saw this featured somewhere a few months ago (and yes, it may have been in a trashy People-mag type publication), and thought it sounded interesting.  When it came up in the library queue, I scanned the prologue, which, I suppose, really has to be the most dramatic piece of the whole book.  It read a bit too indulgently, somewhat reminiscent of “Eat, Pray, Love,” which, while a decent read, is kind of unpleasant somehow.  I picked “Wild” up again another day, just to give it one more chance before returning it to the masses, and found that it’s really good.  The woman is from Minnesota, so there are all manner of references to this great state.  The bulk of it, when she’s on trail, rewinds my mind instantly to all those ill-advised backpacking trips of the college years, the love and the hate and the dehydration-induced drama and waterworks…  She makes it funny, poking fun at herself and seeing the humor in her surroundings and inner dialogues.  It’s mildly painful.  And yet… it’s got me thinking about that old Dana Design holed up somewhere in the basement.

Then this:

popped into my head.  And I felt a little less wild.

wagon wheel, 1st ed.

Happy Friday, friends!  Here are some nuggets (or nougat, if your taste buds swing that way), that I’ve happened upon during this week’s frolicks amidst the interwebs. 

The 5 Creepiest Urban Legends (That Happen to be True)

Cracked is one of those horribly wonderful sites that ropes you in with some random Facebook post (in this case 6 Great Old-Timey Comics for [Traumatizing] Kids) and then keep you sucked in by peppering each and every page with lists of stupidly innocuous things that for some reason you MUST find out about right this very second.  I found 5 Creepiest when I navigated over to their Horror section, seems like it might actually be worth a read.

Radiolab : Crossroads short

I love me some radiolab.  Topics are usually pretty obscure but well researched, and the production is kind of campy and odd, so it makes for a fun and experiential listening experience.  Perusing podcasts this week to facilitate my morning toilette (which, in French, means getting ready, and not anything gross or poop-related), I came across this short which piqued my interest ginormously.  The subject is Robert Johnson, a 1920s Blues musician who, initially, was really, really bad.  Until, that is, he sold his soul to the devil.  He is still considered today to be one of the best Blues guitarists who’s ever lived.

Outside Mag + Gluten-free feature

And, heading back into the known world… I’m pretty sure pre- and post-race festivities (read pasta feed and beer gardens) are not nearly as fun for gluten-free runners they appear to be for the non-allergic counterparts.  It’s been an interesting challenge to find advice suitable to my needs, to the extent that I basically stopped trying, and just rely on my Clif and Luna bars to get me through.  This article (Are You Too Sensitive? The gluten-free movement isn’t just a fad. It could be the performance boost you’ve been missing.) popped up in an email and, while it’s a bummer that more and more peeps are becoming sensitive/allergic to gluten, it does make me happy that there’s more exposure and thereby more info available.

Pre-run eating, quelle PITA.

In case you’re wondering, I’m basing the quelle above on my belief that pain, in French, is douleur (and I’m totally not even bothering to look this up right hyeh), which would make PITA (aka pain-in-the-arse) feminine, necessitating an appropriate, um… ah, I don’t have any idea what form of speech or whatevs that would be.  Rejoinder?  Nope.  It’s quantifying something.  Again, not looking it up, yo.

Back to the original point: trying to figure out when and what to eat before runs makes me want to stab myself in the groin with an icepick.  It really doesn’t, but it’s fun to think about, isn’t it?  Yes, yes it is.  Anyhoo, this is a good post to check out if you want some suggestions about how long in advance to eat stuff if you’re doing a long run, or a shorter run, or what-have-you. Basically, I think it all comes back to this: eat a Clif bar.

1 space after a period. It’s a real thing (and yet it feels so wrong).

This is a real thing.  It’s not just laziness.  And yet… I simply DO NOT WANT to do it.  It’s in my make up to double-space after the full stop!  Yes!  I did learn to type on a typewriter!  It was in a dingy old classroom at Harding High — on green typewriters, I’m almost certain of it!  Alas, I must move with the times.

And finally, in honor of 2 beautiful babies born to friends this week, a bit of Monty Python irreverence:

15.

It would appear that I have started yet another novel.  NaNoWriMo is just around the corner, and now that summer is fini and life has slowed considerably, I have much more time to spend at home, doing the home-bodyish things I do so enjoy.  I would say that this novel is a slice of my own story, that one summer I go back to, that one epic summer…  We all have that one epic summer, don’t we.  The one that creeps up on us, that isn’t fully understood until many, many years later.  It shapes us in ways we don’t understand, bits and pieces of it stick with us more deeply than we know.

I started writing last night, though the idea has been with me for a while.  It’s this idea of the Hero’s Journey, an idea popularized by Joseph Campbell, but it’s connected to so many other things.  At the end of the day, it’s the human experience, and we all have that Hero’s Journey in our past somewhere.  It’s like how a cliche is a cliche because there’s truth behind it; the Hero’s Journey resonates because we all experience it in our lives.

Neil Young & Crazy Horse / Big Time

14.

I have to laugh at this!  I have intended to write for a few hours tonight, but was quickly distracted by shiny things and inspiration to find good novel-writing software.  As I was perusing a forum looking for suggestions, one of the users referred to this song in his info, just as I thought to myself “GET BACK TO WRITING”.

I swear, I do nothing so well as I put off writing.  And it is the one thing I truly love working on.  Crazy old monkey mind!

Joy Division / Love Will Tear Us Apart

26.

I’m feeling better today, after getting a lot of sleep last night, and also taking a good chunk of time to meditate this morning, and taking a walk, and finally getting outside to do some yard work.  Sometimes I just need to get out of my mind, and focus on something else.  That something else, in addition to leaves-raking I was in the midst of, was an audio recording of Simon Winchester‘s book, The Man Who Loved China.  I have this confession to make about Simon Winchester: if I could write like anyone, I would want to write like Simon Winchester.  I would also want to have as amazing a voice as Simon Winchester, and as dignified and cool a name as Simon Winchester.
Picture

Thank you for existing, Simon Winchester.

I first stumbled upon his book, Krakatoa, several years ago.  It took me a while to get through it, but Winchester has this way of taking a central thing, like the massive 1883 eruption of the title volcano, and weaving it into and connecting it to so many other facets of life.  It’s a gift he has, a truly amazing gift.  His writing style is really conversational, which makes listening to his books lovely for road trips also 😉

My SOD today is a little Beth Orton number that I like because it’s lighthearted and sweet.  The video is a little trippy, so don’t stare at it for too long!